Readers often come to a great writer’s more famous and mature work first, and are then inspired to methodically go through the backlist. This entails reading early, not-so-great work after the great books, and this can be a complicated exercise. At the same time, it can throw up unexpected delights. It can also offer a wonderful glimpse of a great writer’s style being formed, a chance to see how his voice becoming more and more his own, and how he is appropriating certain concerns and themes for himself. Read more

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 3.5 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

This is, as with most things to do with this blog, selective and arbitrary. Given that we are in the second week of the last month of the last year of the decade known as the noughties, some stock taking is necessary. But I am terrible at taking stick, awful at anthologizing, because I feel guilty about leaving things out. Read more

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 3.75 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

No wonder Orhan Pamuk’s new novel, The Museum of Innocence, is selling more copies in the Nobel Laureate’s native Turkey than any of his previous books. And no wonder it is being called his greatest achievement. Read more

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 5 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...