About Indrajit Hazra

Indrajit Hazra tasted rock stardom for two months in the latter half of a four-year period in the early 90s. This ex-vocalist of the now defunct Great Elastic Rubber Band is now a journalist leading readers up the garden path. When he’s not trying to finish (or is it start?) his fourth novel, he performs as Editor, Comment Page and writer of the Sunday HT column Red Herring.

“Both Inder and Jamshi have left for Hyderabad to attend Shoiab and Sania’s wedding, which has been brought forward. Oops! No one was supposed to have known that bit! Inder and Jamshi will be back next week.”

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Soundtrack: Who Can It Be Now? by Men At Work

The potato grafting could be done and so it was — under such secrecy that even the rotweillers from the Hindi television channels usually busy carrying sting operations on homosexual college teachers or college girl doubling as call girls didn’t hear a word of it. [Read more]

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (7 votes, average: 2.43 out of 5)
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The Soundtrack: Protect Ya Neck by Wu-Tang Clan

Lying next to the Nizamuddin Bridge that connects New Delhi to its subtler, more expansive outer regions of Mayur Vihar and beyond, there’s a patch of land growing potatoes. [Read more]

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Soundtrack: My Sharona by The Knack

“Your face has melted away and all you’re worried about is losing your job?” Jamshi Narimanpointwalla said with her wholesome, fulsome face shaking in what in the television light could have been mistaken for anger. [Read more]

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The soundtrack: You handsome devil by The Smiths

Scientific data show that the amount of colours daubed on your body during Holi is proportionate to the size of your body. Jamshi Narimanpointwalla, scrubbing away the purple patches on her face with soap and pumice in her bathroom mirror certainly seemed to attest that theory. She had been daubed with various hues, not all shampooable coloured gulal, first by her South Delhi neighbours and then by her friends from the workplace who went from one part of town to another spreading menace. [Read more]

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