Stop subsidised schemes



There is something absolutely wrong with the inclusive growth policies and the policy makers – may be because in the long run, they are the ones who get the political dividend as well as pecuniary benefits.

I strongly feel the time has come for the government to honestly review their welfare programmes before they move ahead with their ambitious Food Security Bill.

Now that the mid-day meal massacre has immersed the country in a state of shock, let’s first take the much-touted scheme that was introduced primarily to bring students to schools.

There are innumerable reports to prove that school attendance increased and the drop-out rates reduced.

But how has the quality of education been? A colleague of mine who has been covering the scheme says that while students and their parents complain of poor quality of food, they rarely question the quality of education imparted to their wards.

Obviously, they go to schools for a meal and not for ‘shiksha’.

It is because of this reputation of government schools that people, despite their low income, now prefer the so-called montessori schools that are mushrooming in the country as they claim to be English medium.

BJP’s national president Rajnath Singh should have done a quick survey in the villages before making his anti-English statement.

Like a friend told me that his maid demanded advance to pay her son’s fee even after he told her that education was free in schools. The prompt reply was, ‘Why should I send my child to a government school, they are good for nothing.”

The government would have certainly done better by improving the infrastructure, making schools a more attractive place for the students to attend with better quality of teachers in the rural areas.

I am sure that would have worked more than the mid-day meal scheme, which nonetheless stands exposed, much to everybody’s horror. And now that the government is aiming at food security for all the poor, it’s time students go to school, not for a meal but for books.

Similarly, the time has come for conducting a physical verification of the works done under NAREGA, loan waiver schemes, subsidised health et al.

Helping the needy is certainly good work provided it really helps them in targeted areas.

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  • Dr. P.K. Bose

    This caste problem is universal. Countries which have new immigrants like the USA have started to create their own new caste system. Indians must look at the individual and not the caste. However, in marriage one must marry in the same caste as that makes life easier and also inter-caste marriage is blasphemy in Hinduism. Though the Jews who want to rule the world and mix all other people to create a mess in ordered societies have a new version of Bhagwad Gita published in North America which has tailored the Bhagwad Gita to their own agenda. Let us look up to no one and look down on no one one but follow our ancient traditions. Caste is good but all humans must be treated equal and given equal opportunities.

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  • dasg

    Just shows how prolonged malnutrition, heat and resulting neuronal activity has dulled this nation, a dustbin of human existence.

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  • Sontu

    Cast should never be barrier between friends. Hygiene deportment and education should unite friendship. However it is imperative that the friends evaluate and then change the behavior of their family members so that each is aware of the other, and then encourage these members to make changes in their attitude towards the other, so when these family members meet either with each other ,with one of the friends, acceptance will follow.

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  • SK

    Growing up in Hyderabad in the 1970s and 1980s, I’m aware of the castes as there are people of different faiths and castes in our neighbourhood. But there were no low caste people, and even if there were, they were not discriminated. While in college, a friend invited a bunch of us to visit his place, in the interiors of Medak district, not far from Hyderabad. Once we entered his village, we saw people in the village streets, but once we came close to them, most of them just disappeared. We did not understand what was happening. Then we wanted to go to a tea stall, the only one in the town/village. We were politely asked by my friend not to. A couple of days later, we found out that my friend is the son of the village head, a high caste person, and all the lower caste people would clear the way for the high caste people to move freely where they wish. Because the lower class people visit a particular tea stall, the higher caste people don’t visit the same tea stall. Living in the city, I only heard of untouchability, but never saw it practised till then. I am absolutely sure that untouchability will die a natural death in a couple of decades, all over India. As for caste, it will live on for another 100+ years, even though there is more intermingling between castes now.

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  • viswanathan

    Ms. Anandan should have mentioned her caste before digging deeply on the issue. You have made out a nonexistent story. thanks. I am a brahmin and I received dalit friends at home and offer them food. If the person I receive is a professional, I pay even more attention to them. I have a lawyer friend who is a dalit, but converted to christianity. It did not change his status. I never try to talk to a muslim on the road. Of course, I visit shops owned by muslims.

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    Imli Reply:

    You are a Brahmin and a Hypocrite!

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  • Anonymous

    It is an example of our intellectual hypocracy that reservation on the basis of caste shall continue but rallies in the name of caste shall be prohibited.

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  • kul bhushan/indiamuseum

    I was surprised to find cast based creamation areas in a modern Shamshan ghat( creamation grounds)in My beloved City Bhilwara.I live in USA and would like to instruct that if i die in India i should be creamated among the poorest and most disadvantaged in Bhilwara.You will never find a better creamation ground anywhere.They harvest rain water.Have reverse osmosis system for water purification and also has library on site. @indiamuseum.

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  • Anonymous

    Same people who practice discrimination in their village are forced in cities to eat from the same plate and drink from the same glass in hotels, restaurants and roadside eateries. Urbanization has not eliminated but reduced such caste discrimination considerably so urbanization of India could be one of the solutions.

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  • Ash

    Great article. I think the best way to do away with the caste system is to stop the use of last name in any conversation or transaction. I have heard that in Tamilnadu the last name is generally not used when used for naming the roads. Great approach!

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  • Al

    Probably, we can borrow from our Muslim brethren the idea of community dining in a single large plate. I was pleasantly surprised to see a friend, a Muslim senior manager, inviting his all employees (of all levels and all religions) to his home and having lunch together from a single large plate together. It may be awkward initially. However, it encourages equality and respect to each other in his organization.

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  • LowenthalLowenthal

    Good and Impressive article .There is no caste matter But political party are using a different caste in the Politics.

    http://www.prlog.org/12143342-6pm-coupons-avail-50-off-on-6pm-shoes-promo-code.html

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  • Raje

    I live in europe, but never ever in any kind of application, muncipality or residence card application or such forms never ever they ask you about religion as well….. why are we such obsessed nation with caste and degrading others…. we all share the same color of blood, we are all humans…we should grow together and help each other as Indians… no matter where we are

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  • Aditya Mookerjee

    What do people know about the phenomenon, personally? I must be a bit different, in my views. I didn’t know the caste system in Kolkata, or Belgaum, where I reside. I don’t experience it, anywhere. What about the people who write about it? People who have had a romantic sentiment, towards anyone, what about the writer? has she had a bad experience, that she attributes to the situation? I regard people generally, and I might be wrong in expressing, that the idea arises, that people look for these stories, and go out of their way to look, and put it in the media. Mr. Digvijay Singh must be laughing loudly, at what the people see in the nationalistic drive of the govt. I mean, the govt, looks very bad, in the light the media is on overdrive, and for the issues the govt. is working towards. The opposition doesn’t do what the media does, and the opposition doesn’t know what the media will unearth, and at what hour. I don’t think, the opposition has the facts that the media has, on many occasions, after the unearthing of facts.

    People don’t know, what is to be done. We are the cause of everything, and people see themselves the causes of different things, at all times.

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  • Aditya Mookerjee

    I meant, in my earlier post, what if I refuse to listen to a person about the caste issue, as a young boy? What if people feel, children cannot understand, what living in a society is? A young child is as responsible in a society, as an adult. Parents are saying, their children were misbehaved with, were deprived, etc. In Kolkata, people used to say, their parents are suffering from cancer, at traffic lights, and they were seen more than once, in the same situation, asking for money. The child is responsible in what manner, living in a society where he/she is exploited, and how?

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