Unseemly haste in unedifying times



In the season of Twenty20 cricket, it’s not surprising that everyone is in an unseemly haste. While the frantic running between the wickets, the ambitious heaves and even bowlers trying to get their overs through in the stipulated time makes eminent sense, what seems amiss is our impatience in trying to get to the bottom of the off-field mess.For three years now the IPL has thrilled audiences – those that watched on TV and took in the seamless merging of cricket and entertainment and others who were lucky enough to make it to the grounds. Having visited every venue to watch a match in the first season, and recently enjoyed the Royal Challengers Bangalore’s home games at the Chinnaswamy Stadium this season, the difference is clear.

The public have taken a genuine liking to the tournament, beyond novelty value and merely an evening out, and are turning up in numbers to support their team. Tickets are being bought at serious prices and the demand has grown to a point where the IPL has intrinsic value.

And then the floor has caved in.

The charges of impropriety, the allegations of money laundering and fraud, the suggestions of nepotism and favouritism, these are all very serious. And for once, there isn’t an attempt to sweep them under the carpet. If anything, the Modi-Tharoor spat has taken things to such a level that there’s no way any dirt can be swept under the carpet.

From all indications, Modi will go, and it’s a question of when and how rather than if. But, that said, ever since the controversy broke, the stories have flown thick and fast. Everyone who had a grouse about the tournament, real or imagined, has piped up, slamming not just Modi, but the entire idea of the IPL.

What’s laughable is the number of politicians – several of whom have been accused of scams and other impropriety – sermonising from the pulpit about the evil influences of money, parties, alcohol, drugs …

The issue has reached such a tipping point that people like Manmohan Singh, the prime minister, have been forced to get involved. Already one minister has had to resign. Certainly, more heads will roll.

But if you watched news channels or read newspapers, you’d think there was a pressing need for Modi to be tried and sentenced this very instant. Why are we so impatient? Can we not wait till April 26, just days away, when the Governing Council will take the matter forward?

If we all enjoyed the IPL, which certainly seemed the case, we should at least give Modi the opportunity to defend himself, or resign. What’s that phrase about giving the devil his due?

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  • Probhat Sukla

    I fully agree with the author. Present day parents are responsible for the production of pansies from the school system. They fill their childrens’ pockets with cash, and teach them to behave impudently with good and strict teachers. Very soon India will be producing totally ignorant high-school graduates like the North American school system. Incidentally, in my opinion co-ed schools are also responsible for the low standards. Boys and girls should only have co-ed classes at the University level, when they are much more mature.

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  • Pratipmandal

    The author is out of touch with reality, or still dwells in his Dickensonian world. A few isolated incidences of violence by students do not justify corporal punishment or archaic ways of education. We have the responsibility to nourish a new generation of free thinkers, dreamers and achievers. A Child is like a sapling, and needs a caring, encouraging, fearless atmosphere to grow. And by the way the American education system still produces more innovators, inventors and independent thinkers than our education system….if we should come to comparison. It is wonderful to know that our education system is finally changing for the better – and change is always difficult and resisted.

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  • amalendu

    This article is a shamefully regressive reaction to an incident of juvenile deliquency. Crores of children who almost daily go under the threat of corporal punishment face greater chances of developing a suppressed personality, and related problems. I refuse to accept that use of ‘rod’ will give us our prinicipled citizens of tomorrow. In discussing about schools we often ignore that the first and the most important school of a child is his home. Parents busy in their fast lives, are trying to delegate everything related to child development to schools.

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  • Megha_aby

    You are instigating communalism even if you don’t intend to. How can you even talk about RS shakhas without deoband madarsas. And really, what do RSS shakhas have anything to do in this topic or article?
    I can dare to imagine a country where a huge section of children are schooled almost exclusive in religious seminaries. And it does not look pretty.

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    Abu Ahmed Reply:

    The Madrasa teaches theology, Quran, Science, Maths & English whereas the Shakhas teach how to kill Muslims thats the big difference, amongst several others, between a Madrasa and a RSS Shakha.
    You are hurt, for which I am sorry. Fact is the RSS is spreading militancy all over the country through their Shakhas and it is reflected in minor and major incidents of intolerance occurring everywhere.

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    Jadleo Reply:

    I have not been to any madrasa, but have you attended any Shakha Mr. Ahmed?

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  • desi

    lol..what good have that slam baam stone age old system has done for this country…has it produced a plethora of award winning scientist,doctors or engineers.. no ..what that pathetic cramming system has done is only give us a cramming , non-creative donkeys …who are only good for working as clerks …lmfao… and i have an first hand experience of going through ridiculous amount of unnecessary pressure being put on 15-16 years old kids…this system sucked life out of what could have being an amazing childhood for me and lakhs of other children… and that north American system you are talking about their kids are much more happy,healthier , creative than ours…and mr author…please for god sake stop writing about the education system….

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  • Rahil

    I do not think what the author is trying to project here is right. No matter what, no one has the right to beat children, whatsoever! Its not ethical and we should stand by it. It doesn’t matter whether it will lead to the progress of India or will it put India down on the scale. Unethical is unethical. By showing brutality to children we don’t want to create a China like strict driven country which is indeed progressing much faster than India but setting up a bad example to the rest of the world in its measures.

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  • Capt.A.S.Sehmi

    My story in response to General law suit in India against COAS at the verge of retirement.
    ‘Gen Singh spoilt my reports for not changing DoB’
    Bhartesh Singh Thakur, Hindustan Times
    Chandigarh, February 11, 2012

    ACRs system of Army Officers needs revision as it is based on British hierarchy. All Class I officers should write their own ACR as is being used for IAS officers in civil. In armed forces most of the functions & expectations are recorded in Army Act. All tee can be tabulated & numbered digitally as per completion of activities on daily & day to day basis which must be evaluated by time factor & monitoring on net by respective officers to formation commander. There is no other short cut except to adopt this methodology & give freedom & liberty to do once job as already defined in army rules. There are plenty of officers who become victimized to greedy, super ceded & corrupt officers. My first ACR was also spoiled by superseded officer who was posted in from CASC office. He was posted because of vehicle accident & disciplinary misconduct of an officer who got commission from ranks. As there was no OC, this officer got drunk & drove my unit vehicle out not even informing me as he was acting as OC & I just joined my first unit from Academy. He was superseded & asked me to collect condiments contribution in addition to given by Govt. & credited to Unit Account for expenses. When I carried out his orders & asked my troops to give in the Roll Call, they refused & I reported to CO. Troops were heard saying that CO was taking unit condiments home through QM JCO & why they should contribute. On my report, CO was angry & told that I failed to carry out his orders & he will speak to troops next day which he did. Troops still refused & my ACR was spoiled. He told me & asked me to see & sign. I asked him how he evaluated me & he replied the same as failed in my duty. I told him & signed telling him that paper is with him & pen too & he can write whatever he wants as Govt. has authorized him. Then within a week he called all the officers in his office & I too was there. QM JCO brought one Stain Gun & he asked all the officers of company to dismantle & assemble one by one; to his surprise none could do except me & we were told to move out. Next week in vehicles maintenance parade, the officer involved in disciplinary proceeding went around on my vehicles parade & asked them to redo it shortly before CO arrival. As it could not be done, CO again was outraged. He himself stood there & asked them to do within 10 minutes which they did. He told me see, he got it done within 10 minutes what I could not with 1 hour. I simply told him if Brigadier comes & takes over the command of the parade, it may still take less which again annoyed him. I made my mind of Army Career & decided to get out on the first opportunity. I overcame so many challenges in career but got out of commission service in Armed Forces of India. This is army career, General nothing is your fault this is a characteristic of largest army of India. There are so many incidents which I came across during my tenure & it is just a one.

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  • Capt.A.S.Sehmi

    It is not my comments but trues story of event of my first month of commission in armed forces of India.It is a condition of services & calibre of army officers in authority misusing the public trust & President status in forces.

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  • Martina

    Disagree with the article completely. It depends on the type of child. A sensitive kid does not need physical punishment. Neither can creativity be developed through beatings. Rote learning is possible though.

    And to Abu Ahmed, the guy who stabbed teacher was under wahabi influence of Zakir Naik. If u blame RSS for stabbing done by a muslim kid, you do Diggy Raja way.

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_6T7JL6TUN22UAD7NSR774A44PQ Anonymous

    I do not agree to this. I’ve seen how we Indians behave meekly because of our upbringing. Our education system does not allow pupils to think of their own mind but to prepare them for rat race. How much innovation do we have in India? How many people think out of box to bring something on world stage? How many patents do we file? I do not think canning pupils brings discipline but fear. I was never canned but I still love my teachers. We need to let the children develop their own mind so that they can be different than us. We need to guide them with our experience but let them play with fire till then do not endanger themselves or others around it. The current anti corruption wave has lot of youngsters in it. This is only because this young generation has not followed us keeping heads down. @Abu lets stick to point.

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  • Tsmudhar

    Today’s society has no time for the morality. There is money to be made by hook and crook. Now we have access to internet, the joy of learning through reading books and writing with a pen is no longer there. We have become lazy, greedy and selfish. The aim in life is to have the best car, best house, mobile phones, sons but no daughters etc. Moreover, we employ servants and we abuse them in front of own children. By doing this, we are helping the system to generate a culture that would be more aggressive than the one we are currently living in. I remember one incident when I was very young. My grandfather who ran his own business used to pay his workforce at the weekend. On one occasion, he asked me to help him distribute the pay packets. Upon completion, he told me that the workforce must be paid on time and respected for its effort because we are in business because of the hard efforts of the workforce. I have not forgotten this at all. As an NRI, I have been to India many times but all I have witnessed is abuse at every level.

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  • Vijay

    The author seems like a *********. maybe he enjoys pain. but as a child abuse victim, i could not disagree more with beatings as method of ‘teaching’ children.

    Next the author will say that beating wives is great too. Helps make them better!!! Beating employees can be used to make them work harder!! Hahaha.

    Sensible parents should use incentives to guide their children’s behaviour and completely stay away from physical abuse.

    It is insulting that such horrible thought exists in the 21st century. But then, third world india is not in the 21st century.

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  • Adolf

    India will be at the bottom of heap in few decades because of whole generation of bunch of sissy boys, goons, thugs, criminals from top to bottom.

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  • Vishal Kale

    Great point, Arnab. However, there is one additional consideration. There is a very material difference between now and 20 years ago: the social norms were different, the pressures on students and teachers’ alike were different, parents approach was different. This problem is more of a social problem than one relating to schools. Take me, for example: I would be very, very, very angry if corporal punishment was used on my child – I would definitely consider punitive action like complaining to the principle etc. But I am perfectly ok with other disciplinary measures being adopted. You have to understand that not every child reacts the same way, you have to understand the child and consider how will this punishment effect the behaviour we want to change? This requires parents and teachers as equal participants! Unfortunately, there is little parent – teacher interaction. And whatever little there interaction happens focuses on academics!

    Parents and Teachers alike do not understand that marks – especially in Nursery – 7/8th classes – are not the determinants of success. You should be focusing on the child’s behaviour, social interaction, participation, habits, fundamental understanding of the topic. But in place of this we place inordinate emphasis on marks, and neglect the first warning signals of problematic behaviour! This way, you can catch bad behaviour before they become a habit. What is required is proper training for teachers and re-invigoration of the system to reflect modern realities

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    Piyali30 Reply:

    Unfortunately behavioural development was never something schools inculcated in a child – Not then not now. Parents taught right and socially acceptable behaviour and when I look around, I feel parents have stopped taking interest in their children’s moral education a whole decade ago after Television took over.

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  • Brar_mandeep90

    R U OUT OF YOUR MIND, I thought children had pain receptors, beating is no solution, stop the domestic violence first, that kids see n emulate.

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  • Swarup

    Brilliant article, Arnab!! Your next article should be on the present education system….

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  • http://www.currency.com.pk/ Exchange rate

    haha, that is interestingly interesting, so true yet !!

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  • Guest

    Arnab, You seem to leave out the influence of parents/ guardians at home on the mental makeup of the child. Are not value systems acquired before the child turns 5…all that schools do is reinforce and probably reassert them in a formal way.

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  • Plumbline

    We here in the west also deal with the cancer of political correctness, especially in the area of religion and morality. Kids are growing up without a sense of their Christian heritage here and have an entitlement mentality. They mock religion as they hear it mocked in the media and music. Morality among youth is very poor indeed. They are so wrapped up in thier iphones, ipads, and video games, that they have turned their ears away from the truth. Many have become insulent and arrogant, disrespecting parents and authority.

    2 Timothy 3

    Perilous Times

    3 But know this, that in the last days perilous times will come: 2 For men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, 3 unloving, unforgiving, slanderers, without self-control, brutal, despisers of good, 4 traitors, headstrong, haughty, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, 5 having a form of godliness but denying its power.

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  • Simmi Jain

    Corrupt politicians + Mafia = Terrorism and this terrorism was the only reason we lost such a brave officer Narendra Kumar Singh.

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  • http://twitter.com/tlverma T L Verma

    ” Ibtdai Ishq hai rota hai kiya , aage aage dekhiye hota hai kiya “. This is just the beginning. Many such exposures should be there if we see the past trend of the year.

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  • Naresh

    About 30-35 years ago one needed sand to plaster the walls of his house, would have simply asked some supplier, who would have supplied it by digging sand from Yamuna river bed and supplied, but because of its banning means closing the leagal route to get it, illeagal routes have opened,& large profit is earned by its suppliers, which in turn to keep their business smooth, they pay regular monthly bribe to police, mining deptt. of states, local MLA or concerned minister. The building activity, with large players/builders coming in the field, has shot up many fold but leagal mining pocket shrinking, is leading to larger corruption in mining of sand, or grit used for construction. At present sand & grit are imported from far off places like Yamuna Nagar,in Haryana, more than 200 Kms. from Delhi. The pressure of demand & greed of those involved in these business, forces for illeagal activities in even areas of leagal mining areas, such as mining more than what they are allowed by their mining lease contract.The greater is the demand better are the profits. Therefor to correct the situation we should allow enough of mining that can meet the need of the construction industry, or change construction technology, that reduces the need for such materials, or reduce the building activity itself. The case should be seen with an angle of demand & supply.

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  • Naresh

    The point in this report missed is that sand & grit are the essential raw materials for construction industry. In last 10 years construction activity has increased many fold,so is the demand for sand & grit. But on the contrary mining areas have decreased, In Delhi, after banning of mining in Yamuna, or Badarpur area, the sand & grit comes from far off areas like Yamuna Nagar in Haryana, more than 200 Kms. from Delhi. under pressure of envoierment lobby it can be banned their too. Thus, the areas, which are open for mining, are under pressure of demand, which start corruption & illegal activity, bribes are paid to police, lower & higher buerocracy, also local MLAs & concerned ministers to keep running activity unchecked. To solve the problem, either change construction technology, so to reduce demands of these materials, or reduce construction activity, or allow enough mining areas under mining lease to meet the increasing demands of these material.

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  • Nara Samsha

    great reply of bastered jesus follower slave of vatican

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